Measles

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MEASLES: What Can I Do?

  • You should be aware of your susceptibility for measles. (Are you vaccinated? Did you have the disease?)
  • Know the symptoms of measles.
  • Measles is very contagious. If you think you have symptoms, avoid public contact and call your health care provider rather than going into the office or an emergency room.
  • The best protection against measles is vaccination. If you (or your children 12 months or older) have not been vaccinated or have never had the disease, you should contact your health care provider. If you do not have a health care provider, the Community Health Resources document may help you. 
 Measles is a highly contagious disease and can spread quickly among unvaccinated people. The majority of people exposed to measles are not at-risk of developing the disease since most people have either been vaccinated or have had measles in the past, before vaccination became routine.

 Measles develops one to two weeks after exposure to the germs. The early symptoms are mild to moderate fever, cough, runny nose, red eyes and/or a sore throat. Two to four days later a red or reddish-brown rash appears, usually starting on the face and neck. High fevers may accompany the rash. It is a highly contagious (easily spreads from person to person) disease. Persons with measles are contagious up to four days before and after the rash appears. If you are not immune, through vaccination or having had the disease, you are highly susceptible (able to get) to measles.

 The best protection against measles is vaccination. If you (or your children 12 months or older) have not been vaccinated or have never had the disease, you should contact your health care provider. If you think you have symptoms, avoid public contact. Call your health care provider rather than going into the office where those in the waiting room can be exposed.

 Call Quinnipiack Valley Health District, 203 248-4528 if you have questions.

For additional information on measles, visit The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention measles home page.